How High Speed Cameras Could Propel Us into the Future

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There are so many things in this life that are worth remembering. And with the technology that we now have available, recording those memories with the help of a camera has never been easier. But cameras can also go beyond capturing those precious and cherished moments. They can help to make new discoveries, and help to understand intricate elements and actions like we were never able to do in the past. With high speed cameras, motion that was too fast for the human eye to decipher can be captured and played back with new clarity, leading to new understanding and new developments as a result.

How a high speed camera can mean significant changes
The leaps and bounds that have been made in the fields of science, technology, and medicine over the last few decades have often been closely tied together. And when all things are considered, the fact that such progress has been made in such a short amount of time shows just how much more could truly be possible. As technology develops, more scientific discoveries are made and more medical cures are found, there is a sincere hope and a very good chance that we are seeing just the beginning of all that can be done. A high speed camera is just one element of that. A high speed camera can capture images and motion that can later be played back or viewed in slow motion or as stills that can provide vital information about a vast number of things, from the inner workings of mechanics to understanding biology and zoology from plant cycles to animal functions.

How it all works

Cameras that have the ability to capture motion at high speed are sometimes also referred to as super slow motion cameras, referring to the ability to play back that motion at a speed more conducive for the human eye and brain to comprehend it. The very first case of such a camera being applied for practical uses was back in 1878, when Eadweard Muybridge decided he wanted to solve the question involving a galloping horse: is there a moment when all four of the horse’s feet are off the ground at once? After quite a bit of filming and perfecting and tweaking the process of the photography aspect, he was able to definitively prove that yes, there is a moment during a horse’s running stride that all four hooves are in the air.

The shutter speed of a camera is measured in fractions of a second, and a typical camera can range anywhere from one complete second to 1/1000th of a second. The longer the shutter is open, naturally, the more light is let onto the film. Most common cameras that are used to take photographs in sunlight will operate with a shutter speed around 1/125th of a second. However the shutter speeds for high speed photography are far faster. In fact some cameras have shutter speeds as quick as 1/8000th of a second!

The importance of understanding intricacies

To some, filming and photographing high speed motion to play back at a slower speed seems like an interesting and intriguing hobby. But in the world of science and technology, being able to understand the basics of things on such a complex level, especially where we never had the tools to do so before, opens up so many doors for being able to create new things in the future. We live in a truly magical age where humans are becoming more aware and informed about life on every level, and this could significantly aid us in making the next important discoveries and taking the next great strides for our species and for our planet. As long as we, as the most advanced species on the planet and the one currently making the biggest impact on our surroundings, find a way to peacefully coexist not only with each other but with our environment as well, we will continue to build a bigger, brighter, more fascinating future than others who came not long before us could scarcely dream.